Hoarding and its Effects

clutter

clutter

I am in the middle of reading a most excellent novel, “The House We Grew Up In” by Lisa Jewell, which focuses on the family dynamics of a mythical hoarder. As far as I have gotten in the story (which isn’t very), the author clearly has a grasp on the psychology and patterns of hoarding. It’s sad, really, that oftentimes hoarders are so intent on keeping an overabundance of possessions that they drive away—or retreat from—the actual people in their lives. Their primary relationships because those with their possessions.
In this particular novel, Mom—who is exceptionally creative—is the hoarder, and when her children are younger she insists on their preserving all the wrappers from their chocolate Easter eggs, firmly believing that those squares of foil will help her to remember and rejoice in the memory of those Easters spent as a family. Her house is very cluttered during those years, but following a tragedy the hoarding escalates dramatically.
This is reflective of real life; there is always a trauma, or at least some basic anxiety behind hoarding.
Since the advent of TV shows featuring hoarders, much attention has been paid to this syndrome. Some of us fear we have become hoarders, when actually we have saved a few sentimental items. Others among us actually do hoard to a dangerous extent, then point to the examples in these shows to prove to ourselves that we’re not “that bad” and don’t have a real problem after all.
Like anything else, it’s best to nip it in the bud. If you know and love a hoarder, don’t delude yourself that you can clear their home out and everything will be hunky-dory; there is often a great deal of anxiety attached to a hoarder not having enough things in his or her space.
I grew up with a hoarder, and thought it was extreme. Then I learned about the levels and found that what I lived with was only a Level 1 out of 5. Level 1 hoarders never allow the exits to be blocked: If you can access the nearest exit in case of fire, you are not considered that bad a hoarder. Level 5 is so extreme it often leaves houses looking ready to topple from all that stuff.
To be diagnosed as a hoarder, it has to interfere with your day-to-day functioning. So…if you have enough money to just rent a bunch of storage spaces, or to have a gazillion-room house with certain rooms devoted to keeping the junk, then you do not meet the threshold for a DSM-5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual) diagnosis. But it doesn’t mean it’s not a problem.
Like any other issue, hoarding affects the entire household and often affects friendships outside of the family unit. Sometimes people are so intent on keeping their “treasures” that spouses or significant others find themselves unable to stay.
Like any other issue, this deserves to be recognized and dealt with, and when the hoarder starts to heal, the benefits will accrue to their loved ones too. Sounds like a pretty good deal to me.

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