COVID-19 and Education

The Pleasure of Reading Alone

COVID-19 has put such a dent in people’s plans for education. If I were currently the parent of a school age child, I would likely spend approximately 97.5 percent of my time being frantic. There are no good answers.
Way back in the winter of 1977, the local schools closed for around a month due to fuel shortages, fearing they would be unable to keep the buildings heated. My recollection is that we didn’t act like the children would fail in life due to this time off. A lot of parents plopped their children in front of educational TV shows, likely in order to keep those brain cells functioning. Granted, it was a month and not the several months and counting that we are dealing with now. We did not have internet available then, so Zoom sessions were not an option. And those Zoom sessions, for all their advantages, contribute to a digital divide that could have lingering effects for those without internet access.
What might be a viable alternative? Worksheets and/or being delivered to the students’ homes? Radio shows? Accessibility for all is so important.
Many children are currently missing out on a lot of services that schools have been providing, including guidance counselors, school nurses, teachers seeing children physically so they can know and report if the child is being abused or neglected…. I didn’t mention food because so many are working so hard to fill that gap. And of course these children get lonely without the same-age friends they would come in contact with during a normal school day.
Then there is college, which is attracting a lot of attention in the media these days. If someone contracts COVID while living on campus, many schools send them home. Worst thing to do, in my opinion, because you are now spreading the virus from campus to the student’s home location. I hope colleges start just quarantining these students.
Many students are taking their courses online, which is of course better than nothing but often feels less than satisfactory. Labs, etc. cannot be conducted online. Plus there is the social experience of being a college student. I cannot fathom what it would have been like had this pandemic occurred when I was headed off for my freshman year.
I do know I would not have been headed off anywhere, and would have spent the next several months arguing with my parents. But they were footing the bill and I was not on scholarship, so they had the power and they would have used it by informing me that there was no way their money was being used to send me into a highly infectious environment. It would have been a challenging “gap year.”
Students paying their own way and/or on scholarship are another matter. What parent is willing to have their child lose a scholarship out of fear of infection? Again, I cannot imagine being in that position: No good answers here. If a student is paying their own way, they have the power to decide what risks to take. My own experience with students who pay their own way is, they are very measured in their decision making process. I would be curious to know how many of the self-payers forestall their education compared to those whose parents have agreed to foot the bill.
Like probably about 110 percent of the population, I look forward to the day this is no longer an issue.

September 16, 2020 | Posted in: Uncategorized | Comments Closed

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