A Nation in Need of Comfort

1028641_rainbow_in_the_backyardThere have been so many tragedies this past month or so, that it feels we are a nation in mourning. And in shock. Police officers being murdered on two different occasions, the tragic attack in Nice, France that left so many dead… When I drive down the street and see American flags, some are at half-staff and some at full height. It has occurred to me that with so many tragedies, it is difficult to keep up with knowing at what height the flag should be displayed. It is up to the President of the United States to determine when and for how long flags are lowered, and keeping abreast of those proclamations—well, it requires a lot of attention.
If you are a law enforcement officer anywhere in this country, or if you know or love an officer, I am very sorry for your loss. Though law enforcement is not my specialty, it is clear that the loss of any officer in such a brutal way, is a loss to the entire law enforcement community. No one should have to fear being ambushed on or off the job.
We are a nation in shock. In mourning. In anger. In confusion. In trauma. A lot of us may not know what to think. But none of it is good.
And a lot of us feel powerless. What is one person to do against the possibility of a next assailant? I am sure a lot of people are puzzling over this. And I do have an answer. No, it does not involve prevention, though I would love to have an answer for that. And anything that could prevent a disaster would be publicized far more widely than this blog ever will.
We are in serious need of comfort. Let us, please, go out of our way to be kind to one another. It won’t fix things, but it can make them more bearable. And you never know, maybe the person on the receiving end of your smile or kind words is in more dire need of your kindness than you will ever know. Maybe they will feel inclined to follow your example, to be a little kinder themselves. Maybe we can start with a smile, a comforting word, a sincere compliment, holding a door open, letting someone ahead of us in traffic…
This just feels to me like something that can’t hurt, and just may help some people find some joy in the midst of all this sorrow. So let’s get started.

Being Believed

emotions-Tino SmithAn acquaintance of mine (No, mot a client) sought counseling after suffering abuse that would rival stories more likely to be heard from oppressed women in third-world countries. The counselor’s response? “You read too much; those things don’t happen.” I’m amazed this person kept trying till they found someone to take them seriously.
In contrast, when I survived an abusive situation several years ago and attended a support group, I was immediately believed. That was incredibly therapeutic.
To be fair, there is the occasional person who lies about being abused, usually with some ulterior motive in mind such as gaining a legal advantage. These people make it more difficult for true victims, and should be ashamed of themselves. The overwhelming majority, however, are far more likely to understate the extent of their suffering, and are not at all prone to exaggeration.
This need to be heard, and believed, applies to a plethora of situations and/or experiences. For those who have never heard of Re-evaluation Co-counseling—yes, I am aware that that is the overwhelming majority of the population—it is a movement instituted by Harvey Jackins and is geared toward non-professionals. In a nutshell, 2 or more people share their stories with one another, process the attendant emotions, and ultimately reach resolution. The theory is that processing of the emotions, what Freud referred to as catharsis, is necessary and sufficient for coming to terms with an individual’s angst.
The part I find interesting is, a group member may not wish to share their actual story. They are sometimes told “Then make a story up; it will have the same emotional content.” (Sometimes I wonder if histrionics who invent lies for attention have this end in mind.)
Memory can be a funny thing. Often people will recall the gist of an event but details will get confused. Memories are frequently “chunked” with other memories. Essentially, when the details of a story turn out to be inaccurate, this does not mean a person is lying; they are giving you their own best and most honest recollection.
As a counselor, it is not my job to grill a client regarding the accuracy of their recollection. My job is to help them process the event and help them develop the best possible coping skills and help to make peace with their own unique traumatic history. This starts with listening to, and believing, their story.

Book Recommendation: “Being Mortal” by Atul Gawande

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Atul Gawande is a surgeon who shares experiences that led to his learning the nuances of “the conversation” – that talk doctors have, or avoid, when a patient faces a terminal diagnosis. What is the person’s desire? What are the desires behind the desire? “The talk” is not only difficult, it’s complex. And very important.

It is no secret that as modern medicine advances, it also creates major conflicts about facing infirmity, aging, and death. Dr. Gawande does this so artfully that I find myself recommending the book to anyone who expects to die one day.

Were many of us aware that aging is not simply a choice between toughing it out at home alone, or going to the sterile environment found in many nursing homes?Numerous options exist for staying in one’s home while getting help, through creating neighborhood support. Beacon Hill Village (in Boston) is one such group, Athens Village (in Ohio) is another. The Eden Alternative was conceived in a nursing home environment, and its principles can now be accessed across numerous settings (www.edenalt.org).

These are not options limited to the very wealthy; they are designed to keep costs within the budget of each individual (yes, including Medicaid), as well as to encourage maximum independence. Some assisted living facilities have created “family settings” consisting of about a dozen or so rooms centered around a community kitchen. What a refreshing change from taking Grandma to live at a new place, and she winds up having lunch with about 100 of her “newest friends!”

Nowadays it is not unheard of for a facility to have pets. Or to combine elderly day care with preschool programs. Or for elders to tutor school-age children–with a benefit to both that extends far beyond academics. “Being Mortal” deals with many hard questions. And it offers hope. Dr. Gawande has created a gift for all who choose to read this book.