e-Counseling and Ethics

diital-touch-310257-sI have been hearing a lot lately about “e-counseling”. I have no plans to join that movement.
Anyone who comes into my office deserves a personal counseling relationship, which is absent in “e-counseling.” You will see the word in quotes here because I don’t regard it as true counseling.
A critical part of my professional work involves watching your facial and body signals: Are you hesitant, bold, teary-eyed? Are you unable to stop nervously tapping your foot? Are your words in sync with your facial expressions? Is your voice shaking?
Some would argue those things can be picked up in a Skype interview. I would argue that they cannot; it is not the same as being in a room with someone, with the feeling you are in that safe place with a caring professional. And Skype is not HIPAA-compliant.
To me, “e-counseling” is a high-priced version of Dear Abby. Or if you go for the better quality advice columnist, Carolyn Hax. Ms. Hax is a true professional advice columnist, excellent at what she does. She is thoughtful in her answers, and leaves the reader with plenty to ponder. And she does not pass her column off as “e-counseling.”
You know what happens when you send off a hurried e-mail, and it gets misinterpreted because your facial expressions and body language could not be conveyed. Frequently the words alone are inadequate.
Are there times when “e-counseling” can be beneficial? Yes. If you are located between nothing and nowhere and cannot physically get to the counselor’s office. Or if you have already established a counseling relationship before you move out of state. But it’s really not the same.
What about benefits to using the internet before seeing a live counselor? Some people do this in order to screw up the courage to call and make that first appointment. Great. So long as you are aware of both the benefits and limitations.
I received an actual survey from a company that fully intends to set up an “e-counseling” business and wanted my opinion about what was and was not ethical to do. That strikes me as very similar to saying “What would be the most ethical way to mislead your sister?” There isn’t one!